THE FOURTHWAY MANHO E-JOURNAL
Volume 60       July 13, 2019
 

NATURAL SCIENCES – REAL WORLD VIEWS OF CHARLES DARWIN, THOMAS H. HUXLEY, HERBERT SPENCER, G.W.F HEGEL AND ALBERT EINSTEIN

By Professor  Dr. Tan Man-Ho

(An excerpt from the original work, Real World Views, Book 1 by Professor  Dr. Tan Man-Ho entitled "New Trends in Dialectical Philosophy, Economic Forces in Society, Natural Science and Philosophy of Nature",  March  1972 ~ June 1973 Discourses, Chapter 7, Section A: "Natural Sciences - Real World Views of Charles Darwin, Thomas H. Huxley, Herbert Spencer, G.W.F Hegel and Albert Einstein", pp.122~127)

 


Charles Darwin

 Thomas H. Huxley

 Herbert Sepencer

G.W.F Hegel

 Albert Einstein

Richard Wagner

 

A.   NATURAL SCIENCES – REAL WORLD VIEWS OF CHARLES DARWIN, THOMAS H. HUXLEY, HERBERT SPENCER, HEGEL AND EINSTEIN

 

1  I believe that the experiences of utility organized and consolidated through all past generations of the human race, have been producing corresponding modification, which by continued transmission and accumulation, have become in use certain faculties of moral intuition – certain emotions responding to right and wrong conduct, which have no apparent basis in the individual experiences of utility.  (Herbert Spencer)

The present state of the natural sciences is a product of the long struggle of man and nature.  This product is formed in the psychological field of the human species coded sociogenetically and even to a significant extent biogenetically.

 

2  I regretted to learn that our negative emotions and desires have shrouded our scientific spirit.  The overwhelming flame of greed, evils, sex, self-gain and all kinds of negative happenings in the inner flame has formed an army of problems and miseries, and has discouraged the younger generations from acquiring an objective and scientific inner posture of the real world and willingness to participate in scientific research and advancement.

 

Scientific philosophy?  That philosophy of Herbert Spencer is a necessity for all sciences are related.  We use social science to understand, improve and change society and that we use natural science to understand and change nature.

 

4  I think Mr. Darwin’s view is pretty strong, I really believe that the alternative is either Darwinism or nothing, for I do not know of any universe which has any scientific position at all beside Mr. Darwin’s.  I do not know of any proposition that has been put before us with the intention of exploring the phenomena of organic nature, which has in its favour a thousandth part of the evidence which may be adduced in favour of Mr. Darwin’s views.  Whatever may be the objections to his views, certainly all others are absolutely out of court. (On Origin of species) (Thomas H. Huxley)

 

5  What is Mr. Darwin’s hypothesis?

As I apprehend it – for I have put it into a shape more convenient for common purposes that I could find verbation in his book – as I apprehend it, I pay, it is, that all the phenomena of organic nature past and present, result from, or are caused by the interaction of those proportions of organic matter which we have called species and variability, with the conditions of existence; or in other – given the existence or organic matter, its tendency to transmit its properties and its tendency occasionally to vary; and lastly given the conditions of existence by which organic matter is surrounded – that these put together are the causes of the present and of the past conditions of organic Nature such to the hypothesis as I understand.  (Thomas H. Huxley)

 

6  It is difficult even to attach a precise meaning to the term “scientific truth”.  Thus the meaning of the word “truth” varies according to whether we deal with fact of experience, a mathematical proposition or a scientific theory.  “Religious truth” conveys nothing clear to me at all.  (Ideas and opinion by A. Einstein)

 

7  It has often and confidently been asserted, that man’s origin can never be known; but ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge; it is those who know little and not those who know much, who as positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science.  (Charles Darwin)

 

8  If however, we include under the term “religion” the belief in unseen or spiritual agencies, the case is wholly different; for this belief seems to be universal with the less civilised races.  (Charles Darwin)

 

9  Out until the faculties of imagination, curiosity, reason, etc., had been fairly well developed in the moved of man, his dreams would not have led him to believe in spirits any more than in the case of a dog.  (Charles Darwin)

 

10  It is no valid objection to this conclusion that animals suddenly supplied with an excess of food, or when grown very fat and that most plants on sudden removal from very poor to very rich soil, are rendered more or less sterile.”  (Charles Darwin)

 

11  No doubt as Mr. Wallace has argued, much of the intelligent work done by man is due to irritation and not to reason; but there is this great difference between his actions and many of those performed by the lower animals, namely that man cannot on his first trial make for instance its stone hatchet or an axe through his power of imitation.  He has to learn his work by practice; a beaver on the other hand, can make its dam or cannot, and a bird its nest, as well, or nearly as well and a spider its wonderful web, quite as well, the first time it tries, as when told and experienced.”  (Charles Darwin)

 

12  In a stable bond the two bouncing electrons tend to be concentrated along the lines joining the much of the two participating atoms, i.e. the molecular orbit is said to be localized.  Such localized electrons are often referred to as bonded electrons.  Carbon – carbon single bond is an example.

Conformation is defined as different arrangements of the same group of atoms that can be converted into one another without the breaking of any bond.

 

13  The organic world is internally contradictory.  As observed, there is contradiction between opposite and same sex, amongst various species and families, between the plants and animal kingdoms, reciprocal feedings of the organic beings in the food chain, etc.

 

14  Nature sets goals but moves as if without goals or with many goals.  Every change that goes on in the material world is internal change that is internal to the “absolute” of the material world – matter.  Every new phenomenon is a result of internal forces at work.  However, in each material being there exist both internal and external forces.   (February 21, 1973)

 

15  There are some who try to falsify Marxist Theory by bringing Quantum Theory and Relativist Theory to refute it.  They do it out of their own weaknesses having pretended not to know that the former theorizes on the sociocosmic dimensions while the latter two theorize on the nature or cosmos dimensions.

The most difficult thing in this world does not lie in understanding the objective world and forming theories, and thus be able to explain it ……. it lies in putting the theories into practice.  This is an important test for the soundness of a theory.

All the minute mechanical motions, chemical processes, relative motions, etc. in nature …… the sum total of all these motion makes up the dialectical motion.  This is the most general form of motion.  Aphilosophic science is an impossibility.

 

16  Logic is pure science. (Hegel)  The object is the subjective not the external objects in the outside world.  It is a natural science of the reasoning faculty of the mind which is in our brains.

 

17 The laws of dialectics are present and function properly in our thoughts.  Today my thought is a certain being, tomorrow this thought being is negated and a new thought comes into being.  This in turn will be negated.

Before my Mid-Year Examinations (1972), my thoughts is in a state of high tension like a fully overfilled cup but immediately after the exams I found myself almost completely cleared of the problems but the tension partially subsided.  Yet a small fragment of the past exam hang-around still linger in my thoughts and from this self-observation, I soon realize the importance knowing thought dialectics.

 

18 Why is it that every particle has its anti-particle?  I have great confidence that the general philosophical laws of dialectics – the unity of opposites and the Chinese Yin-yang philosophical law can be used to explain this.  I have been thinking that it is these two opposites of matter that unite to give the impression of neutrality and equilibrium.

By carefully working out of the details of the development of matter’s and psyche’s opposites - particles and anti-particles in historical creation, I believe the nature of the universe can be deeply understood.  It is extremely ironically strange; an anti-particle is one which possesses properties opposite to that of the opposite particle.

 

19  Why is it that it is necessary to study in the hard way?

The hard way is the only way to understand NATURE correctly and originally without any idealistic priorities, and this way is also a long way.  So we call it history of nature from the process of the minds.  Why is it that it is necessary to study in the hard way?

The hard way is the only way to understand NATURE correctly and originally without any idealistic priorities, and this way is also a long way.  So we call it history of nature from the process of the minds.

 

20  The struggle that is going on in the human mind hitherto is the reflection of the struggle that is going on in the practical activities of man as material being and his relation to other beings that is his struggle with himself, nature, man and everything in the environment.

 

21  Fix ideas and theories to nature (or reality) and not nature to ideas and theories.  Ideas and theories must change because nature always changes.  Fixed ideas and theories are intellectual stopinders or notes which has fixation properties, so is the beings of nature.  The becomings must not be overlooked!

 

22  Karl Marx published his Critique of Political Economy and Wagner published Tristan and Insole.  Darwin’s book destroyed man’s faith in God.  Marx’s books destroyed man’s faith in the rights of private property.  Hegel’s books destroyed formal logic of fixations and Wagner’s opera provided the cultural background which makes it necessary in order to make these revolutionary ideas acceptable.

 

 

 

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